Three days in Athens-A heady mix of ancient and modern

Day 1

We had a great 4 nights 3 days stay at Athens and our experience was mixed; on one side you have the classical Athens, once the cradle of western civilisation and birthplace of democracy with impressive architecture, most of which are in ruins leaving it all to our imagination and on the other side the modern Athens – a  sprawling mega city teaming with people everywhere and nightmare traffic in narrow roads.

Day 1. Reached Acropolis entrance around 10 am. Not many visitors and the weather was pleasant. First stop was Theater of Dionysus and then walked up via the Odeon of Herodes Atticus theatre (much better preserved than Theater of Dionysus and reached the grand edifice The Parthenon grounds. The area around main Parthenon Temple is cordoned off due to renovation work so we had to just go around the temple amid ruins and renovation debris. You can also see the Lycabettus hill and the modern Athens city jungle from the Acropolis.  Spent little more than an hour and walked down to Roman Agora through winding lanes.

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Theater of Dionysus

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Passed the Athens University Museum and stopped at a cute little café Klepsydra(?) for some Baklawa and coffee. Reached Roman Agora and were put off by the aggressive hawkers (looked like Africans?) at the gate trying to sell some color threads. The Roman Agora was a disappointment as there was practically nothing except a few pillars.

TRG_7504aMoved on to Adrianou Street to reach Ancient Agora. We were hungry by now, partly due to the mixed aroma of food from the restaurants lining up the street.  Had a quick lunch at a corner restaurant with a local beer Mythos. Just realized that it was past 3 pm and the Ancient Agora was closed for the day.

Walked in to the by lanes visiting the several colourful shops selling souvenirs, knickknacks, clothes etc.  Bought ice cream at the Hans &Gretel themed confectionery shop and walked further to realize we were already into the thick of Monstiraki Flea Market! The market was teaming with people locals as wells tourists. Spent a couple of hours in the area and then took the metro from the Monastiraki Station and reached our accommodation close to Acropolis Museum station.

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Hans and Gretel!!!

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Delightful Dubrovnik! Part 2 of 3

Exploring the “Pearl of the Adriatic”, Days 3 and 4

Day 3: Walled city tour

Today was our most-important walled city tour; we joined the crowd at the historic Pile Gate bought the entrance ticket at the small booth near the Onofrio’s Fountain. The nearly two-kilometre long and winding medieval wall with several ups and downs offers panoramic view of the city and the sea- a photographer’s delight!

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You only have to stand at any vantage point, close your eyes and visualise yourself switching back in time; armed soldiers and canons guarding the city from marauders; weather-beaten sailors, hard-bargaining merchants and shrewd traders at the harbour; street pedlars and performers at the squares. Made a quick visit to the small but well-kept maritime museum within the fort with artefacts and remains from the days of yore!

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Done with the wall, we came back to Placa also known as Stradun, the main promenade of the walled city. Fully pedestrianised with shiny limestone, it is full of souvenir shops, gelato bars, cafes and restaurants with exception of the most prominent buildings such as the Church of St. Blaise, the Rector’s Palace (closed for renovation), the Sponza Palace and the Franciscan Monastery with its oldest pharmacy in Europe still operating! The best way to enjoy Stradun is to take a walk up and down the street visiting the attractions of your choice and when you get tired, sit in front of one of the cafes, get your drink and enjoy watching people of all colours and characters until the sun goes down.

Day4:Day tour to Vjetrnica Caves and Mostar

 

I have written two separate blogs on our trip to Vjetrnica Caves followed by our lunch at the historic hotel Stanica Ravno. Please click here to read….

https://footnotesbykaran.wordpress.com/2017/07/21/off-the-beaten-track/ (Vjetrnica Caves )

https://footnotesbykaran.wordpress.com/2017/07/23/off-the-beaten-track-2/ (hotel Stanica Ravno)

Day trip to Mostar

Post-lunch at Hotel Stanica Ravno , we continued on a 2 hour drive to Mostar in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Developed during the 15th and 16th centuries as an Ottoman frontier town, Mostar is strikingly different from the rest of Bosnia’s landscape with its old Turkish buildings spread over the old town. We walk along the narrow, historic old streets, climbed up the famous Old Bridge- Stari Most- the high point of Mostar town. There are numerous souvenir shops flanking the narrow lane to the bridge- actually spoiling the authenticity of the old town. If you have been to Turkey, you can’t help remembering the Grand Bazaar or the Araasta Bazaar of Istanbul. We spent about two hours at Mostar and then returned to Dubrovnik in time for our dinner.

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Off the beaten track – Hotel Stanica Ravno

A day-trip to the outback in Bosnia to Hotel Stanica Ravno

After a wonderful but exhausting tour inside the cold and wet Vjetrnica Caves, We were already feeling hungry and Bojo had already planned our lunch at Hotel Stanica Ravno — a 15 minute drive from the cave and…. we never knew that we were in for another great experience!

Sitting in the middle of the vast Bosnia-Herzegovina wilderness, Stanica Ravno (Ravno Station) has a unique history behind it. The century-old stone building used to be a busy train station during WWW II with a railway that carried passengers, soldiers and prisoners all the way between Vienna and Dubrovnik! The route has fallen into disuse long back but we were told it still offers a scenic cycling route for the adventurous.

The building has been beautifully converted into a boutique hotel with a nice bar and a restaurant. The restoration has been carefully and tastefully done; the main hall of the erstwhile station has been turned into reception and a bar, the station master’s, his  deputies’ and a few work rooms are now rooms to stay, its basement has become a wine cellar. The station even had two small prison cells – now converted into storerooms!!DSC_6601aIMG_4026a

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We chose to have an al fresco lunch as the weather was salubrious and spacious vine-shaded terrace was inviting. The food was amazing! Some fantastic, perfectly grilled vegetables and meat from the local farm (they call it Peka meat). The local wine under their own label was simply delicious! After a hearty meal,we were shown the wine cellar and the hams that were curing in the dry cupboards. We bought a couple of 15 years old wine and bid good bye to the place reluctantly as we had to drive along to our next destination….Mostar!